Roll the Bones

First, some music!

Sometimes you just wanna throw some dice.

That’s not a thing 7th Sea really excels at.  That’s a feature, not a bug.  Risks are supposed to be big deals.  When it comes to routine actions, even those other RPGs might call for more challenging tests, GMs are encouraged to let the players succeed and move on with the game.  As I’ve said here and elsewhere, if you can’t think of at least two Consequences to a course of action, it’s not a Risk.

But sometimes. Sometimes you just wanna throw some dice.

Some 7th Sea GMs do this.  But the game isn’t really built for it.  The dice mechanic has a very steep curve.  This has been well documented here, here, and here.  So if you are just pulling numbers out of the air for task difficulty, odds are you are just wasting your time.

Sometimes you just wanna throw some dice.

I include myself in this.  Sometimes, I just want to call for a roll for a binary chance.  It’s late, time is of the essence, and I just too damn tired don’t want to conjure up a bunch of consequences.  But I don’t want to just let the players succeed either.  I need something.  And my players?  They just wanna throw some dice.

(Ok, I’ll stop with that now.)

A while back I started playing around with mixing the mechanics from Modiphius’ 2d20 system and 7th Sea.  While I’ve long advocated the Ubiquity RPG (via All for One Regime Diabolique) as a rosetta stone between 1st and 2nd edition 7th Sea, I also believe that the new 2d20 Lite, used in John Carter of Mars, is a nearly perfect vehicle for folks who find 7th Sea 2nd edition TOO hand-wavy.  In fact, I’m convinced that you can run the games interchangeably just by dropping skills and changing a few names in 2d20 Lite.  But I digress.  This experiment has led me to what I think is a nearly perfect way to call for binary dice tests in 7th Sea.  You wanna throw some dice?  Lemme tell ya how.

So statistically, 7th Sea almost guarantees 1 Raise for every 3 dice rolled.  I believe I’ve seen the figure 0.75 Raises per 2 dice.  Not quite Ubiquities 50/50 split, but pretty darn close.  So let’s assume that’s correct. Let’s use the figures in one of the links above:

on 6 dice I saw the following results:

71% of the results were 3 successes

14% of the results were 4 successes

12.5% of the results were 2 successes

1% of the results were 5 successes

1% of the results were 1 success

.5% of the results were 0 successes

The reroll of one die improved a roll about 9% of the time.

Going by those figures, here is what I propose:

To make a binary (yes/no) roll in 7th Sea, roll your dice pool against a Target Number equal to HALF of your pool.  So if you are rolling 6 dice, your TN would be 3 Raises.  4 dice? 2 Raises.  Got it?  This is a ROUTINE test (71% +/- chance of success, 80% with a reroll—skill rank 3+).

Want to make it more difficult?  Increase the TN by 1 (14% +/- chance of success, 25% with a reroll).  This is a CHALLENGING test. (This is what MOST of your tests are going to be.)

More?  Increase the TN by 2 (1% +/- chance of success, 10% with a reroll).  This is a DAUNTING test.  Not quite a Hail Mary, but close.

You can twist this to a non-binary result very easily too.  Assume a TN of half your dice pool for base (partial) success.  By every Raise you miss the target by, you suffer one Consequence.  Likewise, for every Raise you score beyond the target, you can create an Opportunity for an ally in the scene.

And the best part?  It works with the Danger Point mechanic.

Need a table for that?  Here you go.

Task Difficulty Raises Req.
Routine +0
Challenging +1
Daunting +2
Impossible +3

Now, remember, this is a crutch.  It’s a little clunky, but it’ll get you there.  I wouldn’t ditch the core Risk mechanic for this.  But there are certain scenarios where I can see this being a useful tool to keep in your toolbox.  I think it can also be useful for players and GMs new to 7th Sea who are coming from more traditional backgrounds (like myself) — though we are perhaps the most susceptible to over exploiting this crutch.

Please do not complain the game is broken when you use this trick as your main mechanic and your game falls apart.  This is a crutch, remember?  When was the last time anyone ran a marathon with a crutch?  Never.  Right.

But hey.  You know what?  Sometimes…

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